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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
KCSM (PBS) 1
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
,000 documents through a data sharing scheme through gtsq and nsa. if the amount of oversight, the budget for oversight is even now is 1.3 million pounds, supposedly a secret, incidentally, which is, i think, about a third of the amount that he spends on car parts. >> the prime minister in the chamber said that he wants to reach agreement or words to that effect with the guard -- guardian. if the guardian is not willing to see the point of view from the authorities, then actions may be taken. can i ask you this question, how far do you feel -- sorry? >> final question. >> yes. how far do you feel that there is a threat to the newspaper if you continue to publish revelations from snowden? is he under pressure? >> things have happened in this country that would be inconceivable in europe and parts of europe and in america. they include piracy. they include a senior official going to see an editor to say there's been enough debate now. they include asking for the destruction of our disks. they include and he's calling for the police to prosecute. so there are things that are inconceivable i
. unfortunately the nsa, as much as we hate it and it leaves a to taste, they have a job do. when you take a look at multimedia, like facebook, twitter, so on and so forth, you have people constantly pushing one side or the other and if they are following these little groups online and nobody knows who these groups are. now that facebook is a public , who is spending the money to antagonize people to take extreme size of -- extreme --es of republican, democrat if you take a look at what is out there, it is extremely hateful, extremely pointed, and a violent tone. why are people having such a the time understanding that government has a job to protect its people? if you are going to put something stupid out there you are responsible for your actions. host: will any of these surveillance disclosures changed the way you use social media like facebook? caller: no. the bottom line is if i am going to say something stupid -- i am a teacher, if a child says something stupid in the classroom i have to address the issue. if i have done something that , i watch whatline i say, what i post, how i posted. an
the loss of 50,000 documents through a data sharing scheme between gchq and nsa. if that amounts to oversight, the amount of oversight, the budget for oversight even now is 1.3 million pounds, supposedly a secret incidentally, which is i think about a third of the amount that the council spends on car parts. >> the prime minister in the chamber said that he wants to reach agreement, or words to that effect, with "the guardian" that if "the guardian" is not willing to see the point of view of the authorities then, with reluctance, other measures may be taken. presumably he's referring to the notices and the rest. can ask you this question? how far do you feel that there is a threat to the newspaper if you continue to publish revelations from snowden lex do you feel under pressure? >> things have happened in this country which would be inconceivable in europe or -- parts of europe and in america. they include prior restraint. they included a senior whitehall official going to see an edit to say, there's been enough debate now. they include asking for the destruction of our discs. t
to be spying on the american people. this includes history of the nsa and so forth and he said with the edwards noted documents every day is christmas in because he is learning about what we are doing now. so he has looked to telecommunications and so forth just turn over information. so we do have a history of spying, but this has gotten worse because the idea if it builds on this theory that the supreme court hacks. you don't have anything with a third party. so you shouldn't have told your banker your financial information and therefore the government can demand the information in the supreme court decided that this was fine, but think about how much more private information you and your viewers are sharing with third parties and what does your internet service provider know about you. everything is on the cloud and that means that if you take this seriously, even though the permission that we gave the government earlier, taking that 25, it's the same thing they did before the implications are greater. because we are talking about the government been being able to find out about their entire
security concern stemming from the n.s.a. leaks. this coming six months after former n.s.a. worker edward snowden revealed a sweeping program of surveillance on every day americans. intelligence leaders say the leaks have made the united states less safe at a time when terrorists are ramping up their operations worldwide. our chief intelligence correspondent is live from washington with more on this very important story. >> thank you. and good morning. a review of the n.s.a. leaked documents show that the majority deal with sources and methods and u.s. surveillance activities overseas rather than the privacy rights of american citizens. chairman of the house intelligence committee who receives regular briefings and has access to the raw classified data tells fox news there is evidence suggesting edward snowden had help when he scored some 200,000 documents. >> we know that he did some things capabilitiwise beyond his capabilities meaning he used someone else's help, we believe, to try to steal things from the people of the united states, classified information, information we use to keep
we had the smiley face emoticon under the nsa slide that indicated exactly how the nsa is collecting data from google and yahoo! where their internal servers meet the public internet and how they are taking tens of millions of records every day. he is saying all of these companies -- this whole soul and gathering of metadata and records has to come to an end. >> this whole cell is not the only way the nsa collect data. >> that is where it all began with the snowden leaking the documents about the prism program. i run it is the u.s. as i write is theu.s. -- ironic u.s. have access and they can go to the companies and say, i want francine lacqua's data and get it. what the companies want is when that happened, we want to disclose to our users, more information about the fact it was requested of us. and they are quite a limited right now about what they can andand how many data report how many requests. they want an end to the whole cell taking of data -- wholes ale taking of data. >> ryan, thank you so much on the technology letter. fiat investing. more on its investment to what it mea
month i debated general counsel of the nsa steward baker and he said between what ed snowden did and what journalists did, once the information is in the hands of journalists it is protected material. a nice reading of our own bbc and the guidelines he laid down in the process, the public interest will weigh heavily and highly in any deliberations he takes. >> >> and what he was engage in, which was distributing the national borders. >> we were cheri in this with the new york times, ordered to stimulated debate, which is vital. >> is their current police investigation into "the guardian"? >> i don't know. communications with you all. >> i have seen scotland yard say they are holding an investigation. in records, as a public record the committee decided to call the head of am i 5 in open session. >> did you have advance notice of the questions asked of you today? >> the general areas of concern that might be covered. the intelligence and security meeting, carefully manicured questions, rehearsed questions, the committee accused of approval for the government, and the cheerleaders
this week. he defended his newspaper's decision to publish surveillance piles clicked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> can i call the committee to order? i welcome our witness to today's session, alan rusbridger, the editor of "the guardian." mr. rusbridger, you are giving evidence as part of the committee's inquiry into counterterrorism. thank you very much for coming here this afternoon. can i refer all those present to the register of members? can i ask other members to declare any special interests? >> thank you, chair. i have written to the guardian on this issue. >> thank you. i should say that we are all "guardian" readers, some more avidly than others. we will declare our interests. i did read it this morning. facts,bridger, just some and members of the committee will come and question you on a number of issues. a reference was made to some newspapers you have been to come year against her wishes. you are here as part of an inquiry. you don't feral -- feel under any compulsion, were you? >> i wasn't aware it was optional, but i'm gl
lunch choices at $7.99. sandwiches, sads and more. >>> the worst may be yet to come, from the former nsa contractor who is leaking national security secrets, and that fear comes at a time when we are being warned about our safety. here's chief intelligence correspondent katherine heritage. >> reporter: with the collapse of the arab spring and the rise of extremist groups, this recent attack in lebanon was blamed on an al qaeda franchise. the chair of the central intelligence committee spoke with candor on a sunday talk show. >> i think terror is up worldwide. statistics indicate that. the fatalities are way up. >> reporter: the counterpart in the house, mike rogers, said we're fighting amongst ourselves about how the intelligence agency should operate, making it difficult to stop threats. against this backdrop, already leaked documents from edward snowden and threat of more were described as crippling. >> this is catastrophic for the safety and security of the american nation, what this very narcissistic young man has done. >> reporter: a review of the nsa leaks show the majority now dea
you to guide you with a man whom he wrote a report to the prime minister. nsa his shots hitting the open house now he thinks something is that we had easter dinner and so we should have been another one which is so very many companies but another one maybe the solution should be that we should negotiate in every company in which the negation of research that we will not we do not have time to have to open the singer or fall on defense companies such as the movie there's this this here in france that done you are attracted to the deal mention it just now. this fear that said this is the slippery slope and which show afterwards. i will work the round the clock year this same as in other places we've just seen. and that france could become a little bit too much like will just head over the united states black friday one of our christmas shopping season starts in the store is open all the time. did you fear is though perhaps front of you a bit less french if you let the stores open. while. i think the prawn is not france or another country that brought in to see how you protect the
to admit they know him. they lied about benghazi, the irs, nsa, fast and furious. nobody believes him anymore. >> uncle omar is not a lie. that's been proven. >> president obama, nephew obama is the liar. >> he's not. by the way, they never asked him two years ago. >> three. >> three years ago from the press office. they never asked him first. this time asked hill and he gave a truthful answer. >> come on. >> one of them that he unequivocally lied about is the video about benghazi. that was a complete fabrication. they arrested a man, used the power and resources of the government to railroad a guy. >> if you want to go to benghazi do you think it's just possible that the government couldn't tell us the whole truth because things were happening in benghazi that were -- >> purposely lied to the us. >> though there are things we shouldn't know and you would support us not knowing p it is a cia action. >> the that never justifies affirmatively lying about a video. >> we didn't lie about a video. what did he lie about? >> said this was a spontaneous -- >> he knew better. they did know bet
now have the nsa, which i understand does something like $3 billion of worldwi--wide eavesdropping. so what we have that's comparable is a f--a flood tide of intelligence which seems to overwhelm the circuitry. what we seem to be lacking is--then and now is careful analy--an--analysis to say, 'well, we've got this tide of intelligence. what direction is it falling in? what do these jigsaw pieces tell us if we can put them together?' that was a failing prior to pearl harbor and obviously a failing now. c-span: vincent astor. what did he do for fdr? >> guest: well, i mentioned a moment ago that the united states didn't go into the intelligence business in a serious way until 1941. we were probably the only world power that didn't have a professional intelligence service. roosevelt relied very heavily prior to, let's say, 1940 on a circle of socialite friends as his sources. there were a group of them who styled themselves the club, and they had taken a shabby apartment on new york's upper east side. they had an unlisted phone number. they had a secret mail drop. it--it--it sounded like t
dialogues. host: thank you for the call. you mentioned the nsa. there was a story this morning -- the piece begins with these words -- next is gilbert from tulsa oklahoma. on the question of u.s. global power, is it the climbing or on the rise he echo caller: -- on the rise? caller: to me it is declining. there is a difference between being that between being the strongest and the most powerful. i think we are the strongest but not the most powerful. the nations we have gone to war with are more powerful than we are financially. look at japan. look at south korea, look at germany. we areere at home, losing all kinds of respect at home. we are all over the world shooting and killing people. barack obama was not savvy enough to understand what was going on in washington dc. we will go to texas, ronnie, what is your take on -- on this? on this is in: as long as obama there -- [indiscernible] normal from west palm beach florida on the democrats line. caller: people voted for change. now that we have so much chagnnge they don't like it. host: al from castle tin new york, good morning. to answer
't see that get you in trouble in washington. [ applause ] >> so to our friends at the nsa, we say hello, we think you're doing a great job. in any event, the senators are famous for speaking at great lengths. i won't do that to you today. but let me just say that i have a great deal of admiration for state legislators. i developed that in my own right when i became governor. is senator long still here? senator -- i see pat. pat, raise your hand. senator miller and senator wong was here. i guess he had to step out. but in any event, i was elected governor at the ripe old age of 32. my birthday was in september i matured. i took office when i was 33. i did not serve in the state legislature. i had served as secretary of state. i'd been involved politically. but i had a chance to get to know the members of the senate and the house the way i would like to and i did over the next eight years. and i realized pretty quickly, john, probably the same way in utah, we have a saying in indiana that governor proposes, state legislature, disposes. so i realized we needed to try to find common ground.
, in their balkan task force, the cia, the defense intelligence tea, the nsa, the joint chiefs of staff, regularly working together. see nature to deputies committee that kept all the agencies working together. we were committed to sharing information, not coordinate, to try to reconcile the apparent inconsistencies and then to make good decisions. you now, i love all the shows, homeland and all that stuff. i love that stuff. but the real world involves all the cia folks out there killing themselves to figure out what is really going on and have to get that back to the policymakers. what leon says is right. you have to be attacked, not passive can an arab intelligence. otherwise everyone just assumes your bandwidth has been choked in 1994 and 1995 and you wind up like we were, not even having a meeting about one. because you are so obsessed with all this other stuff. so the obligation of the policymakers is to be aggressive in saying what we need. i also agree with the comments that were made in the piano about the need to have someone representing these intelligence forces in the room when you're
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)